Monthly Archives: June 2016

Set Free to Love

13 For you were called to freedom, brothers and sisters; only do not use your freedom as an opportunity for self-indulgence, but through love become slaves to one another. 14 For the whole law is summed up in a single commandment, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.” 15 If, however, you bite and devour one another, take care that you are not consumed by one another.

16 Live by the Spirit, I say, and do not gratify the desires of the flesh. 17 For what the flesh desires is opposed to the Spirit, and what the Spirit desires is opposed to the flesh; for these are opposed to each other, to prevent you from doing what you want. 18 But if you are led by the Spirit, you are not subject to the law. 19 Now the works of the flesh are obvious: fornication, impurity, licentiousness, 20 idolatry, sorcery, enmities, strife, jealousy, anger, quarrels, dissensions, factions, 21 envy, drunkenness, carousing, and things like these. I am warning you, as I warned you before: those who do such things will not inherit the kingdom of God.

22 By contrast, the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, 23 gentleness, and self-control. There is no law against such things. 24 And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. 25 If we live by the Spirit, let us also be guided by the Spirit.(Galatians 5:1: 13-25 NRSV)

Let’s be clear about one thing: there’s nothing wrong with God’s Law.  God created it and gave it to God’s people as a guide in how to love the neighbor.  Yes, it’s long: 613 of them as a matter of fact.  But, it’s a good law that sets us apart.  Our Jewish friends find great comfort in it.

The problem that Paul has with the law is in the way it’s used.  We don’t need the Jewish law in order to be legalistic.  Many a Christian sect has used legalistic rules to keep their people “in line.”

Jesus loved the law.  He was clear about the use of the law when he said, “Do not think that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets; I have come not to abolish but to fulfill.” (Matthew 5:17 NRSV)  In fulfilling the law, Jesus chose to remove the legalism and show us how to live out the law in an authentic fashion.  To do that, he taught us how to get to the heart of the law to discover the depth of its meaning.

I’m reminded of the Parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector.  Both entered the temple to pray.  “The Pharisee standing by himself, was praying thus, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector.  I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.’ But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, ‘God be merciful to me, a sinner.'”(Luke 18:11-13 NRSV)

If you see yourself as better than others because of what you do, fall to knees.  If you use the law to ingratiate yourself with God, it’s time for a long talk with God.

We are free.  Free under Christ.  Free to stand firm.  Free to be an authentic human being.  Free to enslave ourselves to each other.

Yes, that’s what I said: Free to enslave ourselves to each other.  Perhaps this example may help: people in a committed marriage are free to love and care for each other.  They are not free to have affairs with people outside of their marriage covenant. They are not free to disregard the wants and needs of their spouse.

We can be free within the Christian community or addicted to works of the flesh.  Read the list slowly.  This time we’ll use Eugene Peterson’s “The Message”:

19-21 It is obvious what kind of life develops out of trying to get your own way all the time:

  • repetitive, loveless, cheap sex;
  • a stinking accumulation of mental and emotional garbage;
  • frenzied and joyless grabs for happiness;
  • trinket gods;
  • magic-show religion;
  • paranoid loneliness;
  • cutthroat competition;
  • all-consuming-yet-never-satisfied wants;
  • a brutal temper;
  • an impotence to love or be loved;
  • divided homes and divided lives;
  • small-minded and lopsided pursuits;
  • the vicious habit of depersonalizing everyone into a rival;
  • uncontrolled and uncontrollable addictions;
  • ugly parodies of community… (Galatians 5:19-21 The Message)

These are things that have the power to eat our soul.  Living in anger and enmity and strife provides a false sense of power.  The Pharisee lorded his righteousness over the tax collector’s head.  His self-centered malice separated him from God and humanity.

Anger in of it itself is not evil.  There are things to be angry about: 2500 children dying every day because of starvation and curable disease is something to be angry at.  Poverty should make all of us angry.  Injustice, as well.

Anger can create in us a desire and a will to do something about it.  To send assistance to developing nations; to get involved in poverty in our communities; to seek justice.

But when anger turns into a need to get even, to seek vengeance, to want immediate recompense, we enter dangerous territory.  When anger turns to hate and we use a gun — we have entered a very dark place.

If we’re free within the limits of love and if we choose not to gratify works of the flesh, where does that leave us?  If we take freedom too far we risk wallowing in fleshly stuff.

Follow Jesus.  We are disciples of Jesus who understand our commitment to each other in love.  We are disciples who read and study and worship together to build up our knowledge of the reality of Spirit fruit.  Paul writes that when we belong to Christ, we have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires.

Living by the Spirit means reaping the results of that life:

  • Love, joy, peace: This is how we relate to God’s grace. These are God’s gifts to us: love that brings us joy and peace.
  • Patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness:  This is how we relate to each other: with compassion and understanding; seeing the holy in each other.
  • Gentleness, self-control:  This is how we relate to ourselves. The Spirit engages us in a better way to be that allows our God-created, authentic selves to shine through.

There’s freedom and there’s freedom.  We’re free to be addicted to anger and vindictiveness and maliciousness and other toxic passions.  Or, we can choose an even better way: to get into that perfectly crafted yoke with Jesus and show the world what authentic Christianity looks like.

Hard to do?  Perhaps.  Agape love isn’t romantic; it’s tough and gritty and honest.  But, we’re in the world, not of it.  How do you honor God’s call to authenticity within the fruit of the Spirit?

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.

 

 

 

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All in the Family

23 Before faith came, we were guarded under the Law, locked up until faith that was coming would be revealed, 24 so that the Law became our custodian until Christ so that we might be made righteous by faith.  25 But now that faith has come, we are no longer under a custodian.  26 You are all God’s children through faith in Christ Jesus. 27 All of you who were baptized into Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ. 28 There is neither Jew nor Greek; there is neither slave nor free; nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus. 29 Now if you belong to Christ, then indeed you are Abraham’s descendants, heirs according to the promise. (Galatians 3:23-29 CEB)

Back in the 1970’s a new type of comedy show was released.  It entailed a live studio audience with real laughter, not “canned” as in other shows.  Carroll O’Connor starred as a bigoted, racist husband and father, Archie Bunker.  He was married to Edith (played by Jean Stapleton) and was what our kids today would call a “ditz.”  Archie called her a “dingbat.”  His daughter, Gloria (played by Sally Struthers) and husband Michael Stivic (Rob Reiner) lived with her parents.

The show made a hit because of the themes it touched on: homosexuality, racism, breast cancer, the Vietnam War, etc.  Whatever the hot issue of the day, you could hear the discussion on “All in the Family.”

The show aired for some nine seasons.  I always saw to it that the kitchen was cleaned up quickly after dinner so that I wouldn’t miss the opening theme song, “Those Were the Days.”

I remember how Archie vehemently fought against change.  The boomer generation was coming of age and they threw the rule book out to make up their own rules of living.  Though I hated Archie’s bigotry and chauvinism, I felt his angst at the rapid changes in society of that day.

We have our own Archie Bunker’s today.  They, too are bigots and chauvinists.  They too fight back at our quickly changing world, desperately wanting to hold on to the values of a time gone by.  I suspect there’s a bit of that in each of us.  I remember going out to play with friends in the morning and returning home for dinner that night.  My mother barely knew where I was and trusted I was safe.  Today, my grandchildren come to visit and I wouldn’t dream of allowing them to venture outside of the back yard.

I trust you have your own wishes and desires to return to a former day whether it’s a few years or a few decades ago.  Yet, we also value much of what our society has produced today.  I’m not at all interested in giving up my smart phone or microwave oven.  I want the best of both worlds and I know I can’t have it.

In our text this morning, Paul is upset with the Galatian Christians.  They are listening to Christians who are corrupting the Word.  We’re not sure who they were, but we know that they felt that gentiles should become Jewish converts before they could be Christians.  They believed that new Christians needed to follow the law, eat kosher and be circumcised.  Then they could accept Christ.

Paul is angry.  And he explains it to them in a number different ways.  First, he informs the Galatian Christians, we had the faithfulness of Abraham who left his world of Ur of the Chaldeans to travel to a new place.  There he settled down to being a wandering nomad.  God made a covenant with him, promising him an endless number of descendants.  Abraham would be the leader of a great multitude who would be blessed in order to be a blessing.

More than 400 years later the Hebrew children, descendants of Abraham, found themselves in slavery in Egypt.  God freed them and while they were in the wilderness, it became all too apparent that God’s children needed more than a covenant.  They needed rules to live by.  So the law was given at Mt. Sinai.  The Law stated how God was to be worshiped and honored and glorified.  The Law taught them how to treat each other; that God loved their neighbor as much as God loved them.  Laws were also needed to set them apart from other nations that surrounded them.

The law was progressive for its time: women were no longer chattel to be owned by men, but had status under the law.  The widow and orphan would be provided for.  The foreigner and the alien should be treated well.  All God’s creatures, male and female, slave and free, even animals were given one day a week for Sabbath rest.

The law was good.  It set a precedence that other nations and cultures couldn’t match.  If only they had followed the spirit of the law.  Soon, prophets rose up warning the Israelites of their responsibility to worship only God, to care for those less fortunate and to seek justice.

Then Jesus came.  He walked the earth demonstrating how the law was supposed to work.  And then he went to the cross, an innocent man dying because you and I just can’t get it right.  And with that act of death and resurrection,  something new happened.  We no longer had to live under the tutelage of the law.  We could be baptized and re-clothed in Christ.

In the early days of the church, baptisms took place at a body of water.  The confirmand would remove his or her old clothing and enter into the waters of baptism.  They left their old life and their old way of life behind them.  They were raised from the waters and given a new white robe, symbol of their new life in Jesus.

This new life entailed living a Spirit-filled life, claimed by God to bear fruit.  In this relationship with God, we have a new identity, studying God’s word and learning what it means to be a child of God.  No longer does the law teach us, but the Spirit of truth.  No longer are we guided and directed by the law but we guided by the Spirit.

And because of that, we are one family of God.  Jews and gentiles are one people, one culture.  Slaves and free are welcome at the table together as one family.  Male and female are equal in God’s eyes.  At its best we are part of a family that loves and cares for the community and for those who are still aliens and foreigners to the community.  At its best we are part of the coming kingdom of God.

We’re not there, yet.  The reign of God is not fully established.  I wish I didn’t have to write this with Orlando, Florida in the background and Charlotte only a year past.  I wish we could be better than we are and I despair that we aren’t.

We’re a diverse people with a diversity of viewpoints.  I serve an amazing congregation who has taught me what it means to love each other despite differences of opinion.  Political and theological views run the continuum from conservative to liberal.  While they are clear on their beliefs and how they conflict with others, they sit side by side in worship and easily give the hand of fellowship to all.

They have taught me that tolerance isn’t enough; that we have to move through tolerance to acceptance of the person.  They have taught me what it looks like for the grandmother of a beloved gay grandson to sit next to a man who believes that same grandson to be a sinner and bound for hell.  They attend group discussions with all of their fears and joys and beliefs in their hearts mixed together with the Word of God.

That’s where I go to see glimpses of the kingdom. As we struggle to respect each other, we struggle equally to view the world through the lens of scripture.  Sometimes we catch ourselves using the Bible to support our viewpoints; other times we find ourselves, like David’s son Absalom, hanging between heaven and earth.  The Bible convicts our convictions and we enter into worship humbled.

We have been saved by faith through grace.  This is a gift from a God who loves us more than we can even begin to imagine.  Rather than the need for circumcision and law, we have baptism and justification.  Rather than economic, social, political and gender divisions, we are all one in Christ.

One in Christ…in a nation of anger and hate, remember that: we are one in Christ.  We’re in this together.  I’m not sure that Archie Bunker ever figured this out.  I hope he did, but more than that, I hope I’ve come to a better understanding God’s call to me to live out scripture in a God-hating world.

How will you live it out where you live and work?

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.

 

 

 

 


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